Product Review: Triumph Traveller Jacket - Overdrive
n18

Product review: Triumph Traveller jacket

05 Mar 2016  /  0
Assistant Editor, Overdrive Digital

I’m not into hardcore motorcycle touring and therefore my kit largely comprises of gear that is fit for city or track use. So when we recently planned on taking a Triumph Bonneville up into the mountains of Ladakh, I knew my mesh jackets were going to be inadequate for the expected chilly breeze, while the leathers would have been disastrous if the unpredictable weather decided to turn up the heat. So I decided to give the Triumph Traveller jacket a try when I went to take delivery of the Bonneville press bike – more so because they had one in my size, a 2XL.

Triumph Jacket (9)

The quality of stitching and zippers is up with the best touring jackets

My first reaction was –this is too warm! That is because it is constructed using 600 denier PolyCordora, which is one of the thickest grades of Cordora used in touring jackets. Adding to the warmth is the removable liner which too is on the thicker side and is rated to be waterproof and windproof. For the trickier weather conditions, the jacket also comes with a removable storm collar. I particularly like the additional wrist lining on the sleeves that comes with thumb holes, so the sleeves don’t move around too much and wrist area fits snugly inside gauntlet gloves all the time.

Triumph Jacket (3)

The Triumph Traveller is constructed using 600 denier PolyCordora, which is one of the thickest grades of Cordora used in touring jackets

 

Triumph Jacket (4)

The large back-protector demands as a straight-up riding posture. It tends to make the jacket bunch up behind the neck on the supersport riding posture

All these bits helped me brave the rain storm that we encountered on our way up to Leh. The waterproofing worked quite well too. In fact, the outer shell of the jacket in itself is water resistant to a fair degree, meaning you can happily ride under a mild drizzle and remain dry without using the liner. The Traveller comes with four, fairly large weatherproof pockets at the front, much like the ones on Triumph’s range topping Trek touring textile jacket.

Triumph Jacket (10)

The Traveller comes with a thick inner-liner that is wind and weather proof

The quality of stitching is better than what I’ve come across in other jackets. The sleeves and waist come with button and buckle type adjusters, respectively. The CE certified Knox armour comprises of viscoelastic silicone protectors placed in the shoulders and elbows. The pockets for the elbow protectors are a tight fit, so while removing the armour is easy, fitting it back in needs patience. The jacket comes with a large foam back armour that demands a straight-up riding posture. A supersport posture makes the back of the jacket bunch up behind the neck.

Triumph Jacket (5)

Buckles, zippers and buttons all around the jacket make sure that you can adjust the fit to suit your preference

At ₹16,925, the Traveller is cheaper than most other touring jackets. Triumph only offers it in one color though. Its sizing is larger than expected as it accommodates the thick liner and leaves some room for extra layers, should the weather demand it. For that reason alone, I would recommend trying it out before purchase rather than buying it purely on the basis of the sizing chart. The chart won’t be wrong, but considering that you would seldom use the liner in our weather conditions, the jacket alone could end up becoming too loose to be useful despite the adjustments for the waist and the sleeves. Otherwise, it is an excellent buy for the quality, usability and price.

Triumph Jacket (8)



To stay at the cutting edge of automotive news in India, follow Overdrive on Twitter (@odmag) or on Facebook (facebook.com/odmag). Or download our app from the iOS or Android app stores today.


Find your next car
OR
opinion
Shubhabrata Marmar
quote
23 Jun 2017
Income lax department
Should someone earning a living from a vehicle get priority at...
Bob Rupani
quote
15 Jun 2017
The lal batti and VIP culture
The government has banned the ‘lal batti’ or red beacon...